Medicare FAQs

It’s fast and easy. On the average it takes most people about 10 minutes to self-enroll into a Medicare Advantage or Part D plan on our platform. If you are interested in a Medicare Supplement Plan please go to our ‘Need Help’ page.

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The carrier will automatically send you ID Cards in the mail prior to your Coverage Start Date (usually the 1st of the following month) after they approve your application. Don’t worry if there are any issues with your application the Carrier and/or one of our agents will reach out to you to solve them.

Nothing at all, we don’t charge anyone to enroll into Medicare. Any premiums due will be between you and Social Security or you and the Carrier. Even if you were unable to complete the self-enroll and needed assistance from one of our licensed and certified agents, our service is 100% cost-free. We are happy to assist you.

The government does not recommend or suggest for individuals to get any specific type(s) of plans.

Actually, a lot of them are premium-free, but it just depends on which plan is good for you. Carriers set a fixed amount for their plans each year. A lot of people end up only paying Part B Premiums.

Yes and no. Part B does have a premium but some people qualify for Medicare Savings Programs which can help them pay their premium and sometimes all of it!

No, Medicare is for individuals. You both would have to enroll into separate plans. This is beneficial because although you are married you both may take different medications, have different doctors or separate health conditions – in turn we can find you a plan that suits your specific individual need on our enrollment platform.

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Easy! Just call Social Security, even if you lost your card we can still get you enrolled. They can provide you your coverage start dates, Medicare ID # and even send you a replacement for your new card. If you don’t have the appropriate Parts of Medicare they can even help you enroll into A and/or B.

SSA (Social Security Administration) - 1-800-772-1213
From 7 AM to 7 PM Monday through Friday

Take a look at this the sample image above, this is a Medicare ID card. This card is sent by Social Security by mail around the time you turn 65. If you have Part A and/or B it will have a date under ‘Coverage Starts’.

You do not have to enroll in Medicare when you turn 65 if you have creditable coverage. You technically do not have to enroll in Medicare if you do not want to. Although Medicare is not required, it is vital to be aware that if you join up later without adequate coverage, you will be subject to fines that may last the rest of your life.

The most common reason for a new beneficiary delaying Medicare enrollment is that they receive coverage via their employment. However, not all group insurance is acceptable. If the coverage is creditable, it will be determined by the size of your employment.

Creditable Coverage - means that the coverage you have is expected to pay on average as much as the standard Medicare prescription drug coverage

When you first become eligible for Medicare, you should apply. The standard recommendation is three months before you turn 65. You'll know there won't be a gap in coverage if you apply before you reach 65. You also don't want to be penalized for enrolling late.

If you get Social Security payments, you will immediately receive Parts A and B. If you aren't already enrolled in Part A, the ideal time to do so is during your Initial Enrollment Period.

 

Part A will be premium-free if you worked for a minimum of 10 years. Even if you're still working, it's a good idea to join Part A to reduce your out-of-pocket medical expenses.

The best time to enroll in Part B if you're retiring is during your Initial Enrollment Period. Check with your health administration to see if your workplace plan is creditable if you are still working over 65.

Creditable Coverage - means that the coverage you have is expected to pay on average as much as the standard Medicare prescription drug coverage

So then, when you retire or quit your employer health plan, you can enroll in Part B. You will be eligible for a Special Enrollment Period during which you will be able to enroll without penalty. You should enroll in Part B during your Initial Enrollment Period if your group health plan is not considered creditable coverage.

If you missed the Initial Enrollment Period, the General Enrollment Period is the next opportunity to enroll in Part A and Part B. You can learn more about this on our page for ‘Enrollment Periods’.

If you’re still working and have health coverage through you or your spouse’s job, before delaying Part A and Part B, we suggest to customers to contact their company or union benefits administrator to learn more about how their insurance interacts with Medicare. To get complete coverage under your employer's plan, you may need to enroll in both Part A and Part B.

If you do not have any type of health insurance at the age of 65, you should enroll into Part A and B. Not enrolling when in your initial enrollment period can lead to lifelong penalties and lack of coverage you need. You can learn more about this on our page ‘Parts / Penalties of Medicare’.

Beneficiaries commonly postpone Part B for the following reasons:

  • From a prior job, I had health insurance (such as COBRA or retiree health insurance)
  • Because Part B rates are based on income reported two years ago, it is best to keep spousal coverage if it is available (IRMAA)
  • Coverage by the union
  • Coverage by the employer

In most cases, you'll get a Medicare identification card several weeks after submitting your initial application. However, wait durations of up to 90 days are possible. You will receive your I.D. card two months before you turn 65 if you are automatically enrolled in Medicare because you already receive Social Security payments.

You can only sign up for Medicare during one of the open enrollment periods. During your Initial Enrollment Period, you will have the first chance to enroll. If you miss the Initial Enrollment Period, the General Enrollment Period is your next chance to join up for Part A and B. If you qualify, you can enroll during a Special Enrollment Period outside of both of regular enrollment periods. To learn more about this visit our page on ‘Enrollment Periods’.

You can enroll in Medigap throughout the year. However, during the first six months after your Part B effective date, commonly known as the Medicare Supplement Open Enrollment Period, is the optimum time to enroll because you will be GUARANTEED ISSUE. However, you can also enroll during the Annual Enrollment period between October 15th and December 7th for a plan with a start date of January 1st the following year.

You can enroll in Medigap throughout the year. However, during the first six months after your Part B effective date, commonly known as the Medicare Supplement Open Enrollment Period, is the optimum time to enroll because you will be GUARANTEED ISSUE. However, you can also enroll during the Annual Enrollment period between October 15th and December 7th for a plan with a start date of January 1st the following year.

If you don’t sign up during your Open Enrollment Period or when you’re able to be guaranteed issue a policy, unfortunately carriers can turn you down due to pre-existing conditions or disabilities.

You can enroll in Medicare Advantage during your IEP
You can enroll during the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period if you missed your IEP (Oct 15th – Dec 7th) You have another chance to alter your Medicare Advantage plan during the Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Period if you are presently enrolled in one (Jan 1st – March 31st).

You must have PART A and PART B (Original Medicare) prior to enrolling into a Medicare Advantage Plan.

No, you cannot. Medicare Advantage Plans and Medicare Supplement Plans (Medigap) cannot be purchased at the same time. You also cannot purchase a separate stand-alone Part D Plan with Medicare Advantage; this is not an issue as a lot of Medicare Advantage Plans come with Part D included.

If you have a Medicare Supplement Plan (Medigap), you can purchase a stand-alone Part D Plan.

Generally, you have to have Medicare Part A and B to enroll into these plans to avoid any possible penalties when you are first eligible for Medicare.

Enrolling in Medicare is now easier than ever. Once you've met the qualifying conditions, you'll be able to enroll in one of many plans. As previously stated, certain beneficiaries are eligible for automatic enrolment while others must apply manually.

You can apply for Medicare Part A and Part B in one of three ways:

  1. By calling Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
  2. Online by visiting http://www.socialsecurity.gov/medicareonly/
  3. In person, by going to a Social Security office in your area.

If you were formerly employed by a railroad, you can enroll in Medicare by calling the Railroad Retirement Board at 1-877-772-5772 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday to Friday.

The acceptance time for Medicare applications is usually 30-60 days.

On the Social Security website, applying for Medicare is a simple and quick ten-minute process. You can monitor the progress of your application and/or appeal, obtain a replacement card, and print a benefit verification letter after submitting an online application for Medicare.

Online applications for Medicare and Social Security retirement benefits, or simply Medicare, are simple to complete.

You may apply for Medicare over the phone if you're not comfortable doing it online.

It's just as simple to apply for Medicare by phone as it is to apply online. Call 1-800-772-1213 to speak with a representative.

There may be a wait period depending on the volume of calls. You can make an appointment to have a representative call you if the wait time is longer than usual.

You can apply for Medicare at a local Social Security office if you want to do so in person. A ZIP Code lookup tool on their website will show you which office is the nearest to you on SSA.gov.

Is it possible to enroll in Medicare coverage even if you aren't planning on retiring? Yes. Medicare coverage may be combined with group coverage provided by your work. If your company has more than 20 employees, your group insurance will serve as your primary insurance, with Medicare serving as a backup.

You have the option of applying for Part B now or waiting until you leave your employer's group coverage.

Because of employment health coverage, some recipients may not want to apply for Part B when they first become eligible. If your employment-provided health insurance expires or you choose to transfer to Medicare, you can apply at any time while still covered by your employer using a SEP (Special Enrollment Period).

To begin the application procedure, make sure you have the necessary proof of identification documents:

  • A certified copy of your birth certificate is required.
  • Your state I.D. card or driver's license
  • Proof of lawful presence in the United States or proof of citizenship in the United States

You may also require other documentation. Make certain to have the following items on hand:

  • Your Social Security card
  • W-2 forms if still active in employment
  • Military discharge documents if you previously served in the U.S. military before 1968
  • Information about current health insurance types and coverage dates

You will need to fill out extra paperwork if you are currently registered in Part A but have opted to defer registration in Part B. (listed below).

40B form: 

This form is exclusively for requesting enrolment in Part B. The 40B form must be submitted to the Social Security office or included in your online application.

L564 form:

If you postponed Part B because of creditable group coverage via a particular employment, your company must fill out this form. The completed L564 form must also be submitted to the Social Security office or included in your online application.

Medicare Connex was created by the National Government Services as a platform for beneficiaries to access self-service activities. Checking eligibility, checking claim status, filing claims, and much more are just a few of the things you may do on the site. Many people have discovered that by utilizing this platform, they may save both time and money. Waiting on wait with Medicare may be frustrating, but this website eliminates that problem.

Once you've completed your application, Medicare will examine it to confirm that all the information is correct and complete. Make sure your contact information is right by double-checking it. This is necessary to guarantee that your Identification Card arrives promptly, as well as in the case that Medicare must contact you regarding your registration.

A letter with the decision will be mailed to you when your application has been received and reviewed. You may always call Social Security for help if you have any concerns or difficulties along the procedure.

Yes, you may enroll in Medicare Easy Pay by creating a MyMedicare.gov account.

 

 

Go to your local Social Security office to get Medicare information in person.

Use our easy-to-use Medicare Enrollment Platform on Medinsco to self-enroll into a plan within minutes. Answer a few simple questions and find a plan best suited to your needs. All you need is the information on your Medicare ID Card and to be enrolled in Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) prior to enrolling.

Medicare Advantage Plans are also known as Part C or All-In-One plans. They combine the parts of Medicare into one simple health plan and some even have additional benefits not covered by Medicare.

Medicare Supplement Plans are also known as Medigap. The reason they are also called Medigap is because they simply fill the “gap” in Original Medicare (Part A and B). It is not any additional coverage it simply helps cover the co-insurance and deductibles for Part A and B. Which is why you have to purchase Part D in addition to it. Original Medicare has some options such as being able to see whatever doctor or hospital you want that accepts Medicare instead of being subject to a network and doesn’t cover prescriptions unless you purchase a Part D Plan. It also doesn’t have a maximum out of pocket for the year or benefits like dental, vision and hearing either, Medicare Advantage Plans usually come with these included.